Posts Tagged ‘Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism’

Wisconsin “Bare Bones” 2015

June 7, 2015 @ 9:36 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Friday, the University of Wisconsin “The Bare Bones of Osteoporosis Care” Symposium had a lot of practical information.  This included:

John Belizekian, MD summarized the latest research on  HyperParathyroidism.  While most of what we see is Secondary HyperParathyroidism, long term Secondary can morph into traditional Tertiary, or into a newly defined type of Primary HyperParathyroidism.

Joseph Shaker, MD explored new insights into Secondary Osteoporosis.  These are separate medical conditions which cause osteoporosis and must be addressed if we are to succeed in treating the resulting osteoporosis.

Fergus McKiernan discussed the success of Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty – if you choose patients with the right Vertebral Fracture problems to operate on.

Niel Binkley, MD explored Medication Risks in comparison to the Fracture Risks for women and men when NOT taking medications.

Dr Belizekian discussed new therapies which avoid the problems of current medications.  Odanocatib, Abaloparatide, and Rososumab are all in FDA phase 3 trials and could be available within 5 years.  FRAX can now incorporate TBS (Trabecular Bone Score).

I will cover these topics, along with those discussed at NOF, over the next few weeks.

Jay Ginther, MD

Several patients have called us in panic because their friends told them that HyperParathyroidism means Surgery.  We reassured them that Surgery is almost never needed in HyperParathyroidism.  But we do need to treat it to preserve or restore Bone Health.

Our clinic sees a new case of HyperParathyroidism almost daily.  Only one or two a year actually need surgery.  How do we cure all the others?  Calcium and Vitamin D3 are the key, as long as you take enough.

Most of what we see is Secondary HyperParathyroidism.  That is the Parathyroid glands doing their job.  Their job is to keep sufficient Calcium in the blood.  They steal it from the bones if not enough is absorbed in diet and supplements.  Too low a Vitamin D level prevents Calcium absorption.

Sometimes secondary hyperparathyroidism goes on for so long that the glands “reset their thermostat too high”.  This is Tertiary HyperParathyroidism and is successfully treated with Calcium, Vitamin D3, Protein, and Multiple Vitamins & Minerals over many months.

Primary Hyperparathyroidism is that rare case where a parathyroid gland goes out of control.  It becomes a tumor (not a cancer) putting out too much PTH hormone and steals calcium from bone until it is removed.

Read more about HyperParathyroidism in blogs from last year by clicking on the links.

HyperParathyroidism?  Take Control Naturally with proper nutrition.

Jay Ginther, MD

Primary HyperParaThyroidism

February 6, 2014 @ 7:31 am
posted by Dr Ginther

Primary HyperParaThyroidism is the result of one of the 4 Parathyroid glands going completely out of control.  It grows in size and puts out increasing amounts of Parathyroid hormone.  This steals calcium from bone and raises calcium levels in the blood.  This tumor is called an Adenoma.  The good news is that it is NOT a cancer.  The bad news is that it can and will destroy your bones.

Primary Hyperparathyroidism and Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism both have high PTH and high Calcium levels.  The treatments are very different; so it is necessary to tell them apart.  This is done by Parathyroid Scan.

Tertiary HyperParaThyroidism – Reset Thermostat

January 30, 2014 @ 7:37 am
posted by Dr Ginther

Tertiary HyperParaThyroidism is becoming common among older individuals.  Or maybe we are just beginning to notice what it really is.  The blood tests are the same as Primary HyperParaThyroidism – high Calcium and high PTH.  But the cause and treatment are very different.

Tertiary HyperParaThyroidism happens when Secondary HyperParaThyroidism has been going on for so long that the “thermostat is reset too high”.  The ParaThyroid Glands have been maintaining a high PTH level for so long that they forget to shut off when Calcium levels are high enough.