Posts Tagged ‘kyphosis’

Happy Mother’s Day

May 8, 2015 @ 9:09 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

What can you do for your mother?  Mother’s Day is when you thank your mother for all that she did for you.  Seriously?  That is too much to accomplish in just one day with flowers and a meal.  Perhaps you can do something that could improve the rest of her life!

Your mother is getting older every year.  We all do that.  Perhaps she is shrinking or developing a humped back (kyphosis).  We can prevent that!  Perhaps she has fallen and broken a bone.  We can often prevent that too!

Over the last 20 years the world has changed.  We now know how to prevent bones from deteriorating.  We can improve bone health and prevent fractures.  The sooner we start, the better we can preserve your mother’s independent lifestyle.  Your independence too, if you are her caregiver.

Without attention to their bone health, half of all women over age 50 suffer at least one fracture.  We can prevent nearly 2/3 of those fractures.  A Complete Bone Health Evaluation tells us in what areas you have opportunities for improvement.

We start with enough Calcium in foods and supplements, enough Vitamin D3 supplements, enough Protein, Multiple Vitamins & Minerals and balance exercises.  Sometimes medications.

Your mother sacrificed her bone health for you before and after your birth.  She gave you a lot.  Give back to her.  And if you must give chocolates, try Adora Chocolates with a whole meal’s Calcium in each.

Check out your mother’s bone health.  Yours too.  Then take Control of both your futures.

Jay Ginther, MD

Fractures Get No Respect

February 19, 2015 @ 10:04 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Fractures get no respect.  20% of women and over 30% of men over 65 die within 6 months of a Hip Fracture.  But nobody is worried about hip fractures!

Hip Fracture is never mentioned on the death certificate.  The complications of the hip fracture get all the credit.  Pneumonia, pulmonary embolis (blood clots), worsening heart failure, kidney failure or even septicemia (infection in the blood stream) from bed sores might make the list, but not the initial event, the hip fracture.

Nearly 80% of Vertebral Fractures are mistaken for pulled muscles or arthritis in the back.  Yet vertebral collapse fractures are a strong indicator of death within the year in men and women.  Again, pneumonia, heart failure, respiratory failure (shortness of breath), malnutrition from inability to eat enough get the blame.  The vertebral fractures and resulting kyphosis (humpback) never get credit for the misery and death they cause.

More women die each year from complications of fractures than from breast cancer or stroke or heart attack.  Nobody seems to care, because the fracture itself is never blamed for the complications it causes.

If we identified the original fracture starting the rapid decline, we would be more concerned with bone health and fracture risk.  As it is we ignore fracture risk at our peril, especially as we get older like me (60’s).

Respect Fracture Risk.  Take Control of your future.

Jay Ginther, MD

Birthday Disease

December 16, 2014 @ 10:44 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

“Why did I Fracture?” and “Why do I have Osteoporosis?” are common questions I hear from older women and men.  They are taking Calcium and Vitamin D3, eating a diet with Protein, Fruits and Vegetables, and Exercising regularly.  They are “doing everything right”, and still they have deteriorating bones.  What is wrong?

The simple answer is “Birthday Disease” – too many birthdays.  Increased Fracture Risk (Clinical Osteoporosis) is totally natural as we age.  Women after Menopause, and men after age 70, lose 1-2% of their Bone Mineral Density (BMD), and more of their Bone Strength, every year.

When I was in Medical School, 40 years ago, that was the end of the story.  Many older women (and some older men) became kyphotic (stooped over), fractured and fell, and either died or went to a nursing home for the rest of their lives.  Then, there was nothing we could do to stop it.  Today we can often prevent osteoporosis, fractures and misery.

Increased Fracture Risk = Osteoporosis

May 17, 2014 @ 8:22 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Fracture Risk is the elephant in the room.  Fractures can keep you from doing what you want for weeks or months.  Fractures can put you in a Nursing Home, sometimes forever.  Complications of fractures can kill you.  Fractures are what you want to avoid if at all possible.

Increased Fracture Risk was defined as Clinical Osteoporosis by NIH in 2000.  We may still think of Osteoporosis as a T-score of -2.5 on DXA.  This is inaccurate.  Fracture Risk increases with age and other factors at any given T-score.  Over 80% of the persons who fracture have a T-score better than -2.5 !!!  Accurately calculating your true Fracture Risk requires a Complete Bone Health Evaluation.