Posts Tagged ‘Fracture Risk’

ISCD 2015

March 3, 2015 @ 7:37 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Driving to Chicago in February was cold and snowing.  But it was hot indoors at the ISCD (International Society for Clinical Densitometry) Annual Meeting and Position Development Conference (PDC).

While no new technologies were introduced, the PDC evaluated the scientific studies of several recent innovations.  Most are best done in research centers.  One recent innovation could make it to clinical centers.  Trabecular Bone Score (TBS) is a software addition to DXA that adds information about the quality of bone by re-analyzing the L1, L2, L3 vertebrae.

We have discussed how adding Vertebral Fracture Assessment (VFA) to a DXA Bone Mineral Density (BMD) improves Fracture Risk calculation.   TBS has the same potential.  The main issues blocking TBS are software cost, added time, and the fact that all insurances (including Medicare) currently do not pay for it.

We also attended presentations about patient treatment issues.  Fracture Prevention is much more than just checking a T-score with DXA.  National experts shared their knowledge of medical issues that can strongly influence Bone Health and Fracture Risk.  More about these sessions next time.

You can Take Control of your Future with action to decrease your fracture risk.

Jay Ginther, MD

 

Not Just DXA – Fracture Risk !!

February 22, 2015 @ 9:39 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

DXA is very good at determining Bone Mineral Density (BMD), provided you look at the images and over-read the computer.  DXA alone is less good at predicting Fracture Risk.  But, Fractures are what we want to avoid.

At the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) meeting this week, we will discuss the other modalities, which supplement DXA to obtain greater accuracy.  Vertebral Fracture Assessment (VFA) helps evaluate bone quality.  FRAX was specifically designed to predict Fracture Risk.  QCT (Quantitative Computerized Tomography) has been added in recent years as an alternative to DXA.

ISCD will discuss adding  TBS (Trabecular Bone Score), Hip Structural Analysis, Hip Axis Length, and uses of Central CT.  We are constantly pushing toward our goal – Prevent Fractures.

Preventing Fractures is not just DXA.  Get a Complete Bone Health Evaluation.

Take Control of your future.  Check your bone health.

Jay Ginther, MD

Fractures Get No Respect

February 19, 2015 @ 10:04 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Fractures get no respect.  20% of women and over 30% of men over 65 die within 6 months of a Hip Fracture.  But nobody is worried about hip fractures!

Hip Fracture is never mentioned on the death certificate.  The complications of the hip fracture get all the credit.  Pneumonia, pulmonary embolis (blood clots), worsening heart failure, kidney failure or even septicemia (infection in the blood stream) from bed sores might make the list, but not the initial event, the hip fracture.

Nearly 80% of Vertebral Fractures are mistaken for pulled muscles or arthritis in the back.  Yet vertebral collapse fractures are a strong indicator of death within the year in men and women.  Again, pneumonia, heart failure, respiratory failure (shortness of breath), malnutrition from inability to eat enough get the blame.  The vertebral fractures and resulting kyphosis (humpback) never get credit for the misery and death they cause.

More women die each year from complications of fractures than from breast cancer or stroke or heart attack.  Nobody seems to care, because the fracture itself is never blamed for the complications it causes.

If we identified the original fracture starting the rapid decline, we would be more concerned with bone health and fracture risk.  As it is we ignore fracture risk at our peril, especially as we get older like me (60’s).

Respect Fracture Risk.  Take Control of your future.

Jay Ginther, MD

Birthday Disease

December 16, 2014 @ 10:44 pm
posted by Dr. Ginther

“Why did I Fracture?” and “Why do I have Osteoporosis?” are common questions I hear from older women and men.  They are taking Calcium and Vitamin D3, eating a diet with Protein, Fruits and Vegetables, and Exercising regularly.  They are “doing everything right”, and still they have deteriorating bones.  What is wrong?

The simple answer is “Birthday Disease” – too many birthdays.  Increased Fracture Risk (Clinical Osteoporosis) is totally natural as we age.  Women after Menopause, and men after age 70, lose 1-2% of their Bone Mineral Density (BMD), and more of their Bone Strength, every year.

When I was in Medical School, 40 years ago, that was the end of the story.  Many older women (and some older men) became kyphotic (stooped over), fractured and fell, and either died or went to a nursing home for the rest of their lives.  Then, there was nothing we could do to stop it.  Today we can often prevent osteoporosis, fractures and misery.