Posts Tagged ‘Chicken’

Bones are over 80% protein.  The organic part of bone is collagen, which is protein.  Calcium is gradually deposited into the organic bone matrix to make bone stiffer.  Ideal bone is mildly flexible, like a titanium airplane wing.

Healthy bones require adequate protein in your diet.  Milk, cheese, and yogurt are good.  Lean meats like chicken, turkey, and fish have less cholesterol than beef or pork.  All sorts of beans, lentils, garbanzos (humus), nuts are vegetarian alternatives.

Protein needs are higher when you are growing, and again starting in your 60’s.  The basic guideline during adulthood is 1 gram of protein for each kilo of lean weight.  See our previously posted Protein Chart.

Muscle is mostly protein.  Strong muscles keep bones strong by tugging on them and by compressing them.  Strong muscles maintain balance and prevent falls.

Preparing protein foods from scratch can be time consuming.  Some days I take the shortcut of Premier Protein Shakes.  30 grams of protein, only 1 gram sugar, low fat, only 160 calories, made from milk solids, and they have 500 mg Calcium.

Take Control Naturally by getting enough Protein in your diet.

Jay Ginther, MD

Stronger, More Agile, More Confident

March 11, 2015 @ 9:57 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Ann spends a week in Florida each winter with several friends and was stronger, more agile and more confident this year than last.  She stepped in and out of the hot-tub easily instead of slowly and awkwardly.  She zoomed up and down stairs.  She had to slow down when walking with her friends.  What has happened?

A year ago she followed a fragility fracture with below average and decreasing BMD on DXA, and a newly crumbling vertebral fracture on VFA.  She has Clinical Osteoporosis.  That got her attention.  She was determined to play on the floor with her active preschool grandchildren.  You cannot do that if you are crumbling.  She was ready to do whatever it took to get back in the game.

She added Adora Chocolates (500mg calcium in each) to her usual diet.  She added Protein shakes (chocolate) and increased intake of chicken, fish, and beef to meet the new protein guidelines.  She remembered to take extra Vitamin D3 and her Multiple Vitamins & Minerals almost every day.

She got serious about her “10,000 steps” every day and went up and down stairs frequently instead of saving up things for a single trip.  She did not actually join an exercise class as promised.

She started the anabolic, Forteo, to build her bone density and strength.  A daily little shot is a nuisance, especially keeping it cold while travelling, but she wanted results.

This year repeat DXA showed increased BMD.  VFA confirmed no further crumbling.  She zoomed through airports and left her friends in the dust in Florida.  These results have made her even more determined.

She has Taken Control of her Future Life.  You can too.

Jay Ginther, MD

 

Protein!!!!!

December 12, 2014 @ 10:31 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Two weeks after Turkey Coma at Thanksgiving dinner, we think we get plenty of protein.  We do occasionally.  Most of us do not get enough protein on a daily basis.  The latest recommendation is one gram of protein daily for every kilogram of body weight.  That works out to a lot more than I thought.  See our Protein Chart.

Vegans have a real challenge eating enough protein in nuts, beans, garbanzos, lentils, and soy.  Most traditional Vegetarians add yogurt, cheese, and milk, which are all good sources of protein.  Some add shellfish and crustaceans.

Protein is the main component of much of our body, including Muscle and Bone.  Over 90% of Muscle.  Over 80% of Bone.  Therefore, enough Protein is necessary for Fracture Prevention.

You Are What You Eat

February 10, 2014 @ 9:38 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Does this mean that you have to eat bones to have strong bones?  Well, sort of.  While it is fun to envision people chewing on Flintstone-sized bones, the Flintstone characters did something right.  They ate huge Brontosaurus steaks, which were PROTEIN.  The content of our bones is, surprizingly, over 80% Protein.  Therefore, we must eat enough Protein to maintain and strengthen our bones (and muscles).

The USDA recommends approximately 1 gram of Protein per kilogram of body weight per day.  Eating that much Protein daily will maintain a healthy body, including bone and muscle.  Persons over age 65 actually need MORE Protein rather than less, for the same sized body.

How much Protein do you need?  This often asked question is answered based on how much you weigh.  If you weigh: