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Posts Tagged ‘Bisphosphonate Holiday’

Bisphosphonates accumulate in your bone.  When OsteoClasts gobble up your bone, bisphosphonates are released into the Osteoclasts and disable or kill the Osteoclasts.  This is great news when the problem is Osteoclasts Gone Wild.  Bisphosphonates preserve bone by slowing down bone resorption.  However, after a few months, bone formation by OsteoBlasts also slows down, resulting in slow bone turnover.

Moderate and balanced bone turnover is good.  You repair microcracks in your bone when OsteoClasts resorb the bone around them and OsteoBlasts fill in the void with new bone matrix.  A mix of new and old bone is far stronger than all old bone.  Some OsteoClast activity is necessary to heal fractures, especially incomplete (stress) fractures.  That is where long term bisphosphonates can be too much of a good thing.

“Bisphosphonate Holiday” 2014

March 8, 2014 @ 8:56 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

“You are entering a Data-Free Zone”   That was unfortunately the messasge at the joint meeting of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) and the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) last month.  We simply do not have data from a study involving tens of thousands of patients.  We do know some things that are helpful.

Bisphosphonates build up in bone over time.  After about 5 years of Bisphosphonate therapy, you should have enough medication in your bones to last for additional years.  How many years?  That depends.  Different individuals lose Bisphosphonates from their bones at different rates.  Different Bisphosphonates tend to stay in bone longer or shorter than others.  We call the time you are able to stop taking medication for a while (because you have enough in your bones already) “Bisphosphonate Holiday”.