Posts Tagged ‘anabolic’

“Treat to Target” and “Use VFA” in 2017

April 23, 2017 @ 8:50 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Clinical Osteoporosis 2017, NOF and ISCD joint meeting had a different emphasis this year.  Fracture Risk, rather than Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is now the key metric.  Several speakers emphasizd the importance of VFA in making the diagnosis of Clinical Osteoporosis.  This is something I have presented in poster exhibits 2015, 2016 and 2017.  I am now mainstream!

“Treat to Target” was the big new message this year.  We should set a target of decreased Fracture Risk for each patient and alter treatment until we reach it.  This has been routine for years in diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, etc.  This is recognition that Osteoporosis is a chronic disease that we can control, but never cure, just like many others.

Take Control Naturally is the necessary first step, as I have outlined over the last few months.  This is often sufficient for prevention and in mild disease.

Advanced Osteoporosis, especially after fragility fractures, or vertebral compression fractures seen on VFA, is usually beyond nutrition and exercise only.  This will usually require medications to significantly reduce fracture risk.

The huge change is the recommendation to use an Anabolic medication first, to markedly reduce fracture risk, when BMD is very low or multiple fractures have already occured.  Then follow up with an Antiresorptive to maintain a low fracture risk.  Traditionally Medicare and other insurances have demanded we try Antiresorptives first to maintain bone as it is, even when multiple fractures have proven the bone to NOT be good enough at curent BMD.

We are entering a new age of Fracture Prevention!!

Jay Ginther, MD

Recent studies have shown that the order in which we use osteoporosis medications matters.  Traditionally most docs have used Antirsorptives first to preserve bone.  All osteoporosis medications except one are Antiresorptives.  Only when that failed, would they consider the Anabolic medication, Forteo, to build new bone.

As a practicing orthopedic surgeon, I started treating osteoporosis in the worst of my fracture patients.  It was obvious that they needed to build bone first since there was very little bone to preserve.  Therefore, I usually started with the Anabolic, Forteo.  Once I had built up the bone, I preserved that improved bone with an Antiresorptive osteoporosis medication.

As the National and International Osteoporosis Foundations, (NOF and IOF)  are now focusing on preventing second fractures, many more practioners are treating patients with one or more fractures.  They are facing the dillema of how to prevent fractures in bone that is not good enough.  None of the Antiresorptives work as well in patients with multiple fractures as they do in patients who have not yet fractured.

This year studies have shown that using Forteo after an Antiresorptive usually results in Forteo taking several months to overcome the previous slowing of bone turnover,  Therefore, 2 years of Forteo results in less improvement when used AFTER the Antiresorptives tested, than we normally see in a patient who uses Forteo first.

At NOF and IOF this year speakers suggested that we change our approach.  They suggested using an Anabolic first, and an Antiresorptive second should be the standard sequence for best results.

Would you rather only trying to preserve your bones after they have proven insufficient in multiple fractures?  Or would you want to improve your bone first, and then prserve that improved bone matrix and improving BMD?

Do everything you can to improve and preserve your Bone Health.

Jay Ginther, MD

Forteo Treats Atypical Fractures of the Femur

August 21, 2015 @ 9:09 pm
posted by Dr Ginther

Patients, Primary Care Docs, and Orthopedic Surgeons all worry about bone surgery while on Osteoporosis Medications.  They also worry about Atypical Fractures of the Femur (AFF).  There is one medication that actually helps bone healing and is routinely used to treat AFF.  That is the Anabolic, Forteo.

Atypical Fracture of the Femur is quite rare.  AFF has become less rare since we started treating osteoporosis with Antiresorptive Osteoporosis Medications.  Typical Femur Fractures are still about 100 times as common – and we can prevent over half of those with Antiresorptive Osteoporosis Medications.

AFF is a Stress Fracture, usually just below the hip, that starts on the lateral side of the Femur.  It is a small crack, which can gradually spread across the bone.

The best treatment for a stress fracture is stimulating the cells that make new bone (OsteoBlasts) and also stimulating the cells that gobble up bone (OsteoClasts).  This increases bone turnover, which is needed for healing a fracture, especially a stress fracture.

Forteo is the only Anabolic we currently have in the USA.  Forteo is routinely used to treat AFF before, as well as after, the fracture.  It is also used to treat other stress fractures  such as metatarsals in the feet and “shin splints” in the proximal shaft of tibia.

Forteo is also commonly used to enhance healing in osteoporotic patients in spine fusions and in total joint replacement.

If you need increased bone turnover, increased bone matrix formation, or enhanced healing of osteoporotic bone, consider the Anabolic, Forteo.

Jay Ginther, MD

Prevent and Treat ONJ with Forteo

July 31, 2015 @ 7:54 am
posted by Dr Ginther

Dentists and Oral Surgeons are sometimes wary of their patients being on ANY Osteoporosis Medications when they undergo tooth extractions or other dental proceedures.  One osteoporosis medication is different from all the others.  Forteo is the only Anabolic medication currently available in the USA.  Forteo does not cause dental and jaw problems.  Forteo can be used to treat ONJ and other bone problems of the jaw.

OsteoNecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ) is a rare complication of tooth extraction.  If you have cancer, are on chemotherapy, have uncontrolled diabetes, or are on the higher doses of Antiresorptive Osteoporosis Medications used in Cancer Patients with Metastases, ONJ is less rare.

ONJ is the result of too slow bone repair by the OsteoBlasts (the cells that make new bone matrix).  Antiresorptive medications slow down both OsteoClasts (the cells that resorb bone) and OsteoBlasts.

Forteo cannot cause ONJ.  Forteo (Teriparatide) stimulates OsteoBlasts.  That increases new bone matrix formation.  Therefore, Forteo can prevent and treat ONJ.

Forteo has been shown to improve bone healing in dental surgery, including implant osseointegration and healing alveolar defects.  Ref:  Batshutski JD, Eber RM, Kinney JS, et al.  Teriparatide and osseous regeneration in the oral cavity.  N Engl J Med. 2010, 363:2396-2405.  Ref:  Kuchler U, Luvizuto ER, Tangl S, et al.  Short-term Teriparatide delivery and osseointegration: a clinical feasibility study.  J Dent R. 2011:90(8):1001-1006.

As a former orthopedic surgeon, I have discussed these issues with several of our local oral surgeons and dentists.

If you are facing oral surgery or tooth extraction, discuss your osteoporosis medications with your dental surgeon.  Most osteoporosis medications should be held for your surgery.  Forteo is the exception.  Forteo actually helps your jaw heal after dental surgery.

Jay Ginther, MD